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Between the Lines: Anniversary to reflect decade of memories, pride

Ten years ago, must of us were sitting in a middle-school classroom when two planes crashed into the World Trade Center, one into the Pentagon, and another in a field near Shanksville, Pa.

At that time, I don’t think any of us understood the magnitude of the problem. Who had even heard of the twin towers then?

I was just thrilled my school was letting us out early. I wasn’t quite knowledgeable enough to fully understand what it meant for this country.

Now 10 years, two wars and thousands of lost loved ones later, we’ve felt the repercussions of the 9/11 attacks. But what does this mean to our generation?

We all can remember exactly what we were doing when we found out, but do we know what it means to us now or in our future?

What student here can say looking at a clock reading 9:11 doesn’t remind them of the attacks?

Who has visited New York City and made it a point to at least walk past ground zero? Who didn’t download “Proud to be an American” within 10 days after the attack?

We’ll always be mesmerized by the two beams of light that pierce the New York City skyline and shine where the twin towers once stood. The date always will pull at our hearts, give us goose bumps and give us a sense of pride.

Do you remember how Ohio University and Athens transformed when we learned that the mastermind of the attacks was killed by the U.S. military?

The streets filled with patriotic college students taking shots to the death of bin Laden. You could hear “U.S.A! U.S.A!” chants on every corner of campus.

Flags waved, fireworks filled the air and the national anthem screeched from most everyone’s throats.

When you think of 9/11, you should remember those who died in New York City, Washington, D.C., and Pennsylvania; think of those who died while fighting the “war on terror”; and think of all the ways you can remember this date.

Our generation’s childhood has been tattooed and scarred by the war and politics this one event has triggered. In honor of our country, let’s make this anniversary a special one.

Cori Sherman is a senior studying public relations and associate editor of The Post. Email her your comments at cs182407@ohiou.edu.

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