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Editor's Note: 'Post' reporters' hard work pays off with SPJ awards

In the hustle and bustle to put out our first paper of the year, we overlooked some important news.

Three of our own were recognized earlier this month by the Ohio chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists for excellent reporting published last calendar year. In total, SPJ honored seven college journalists, meaning Post reporters took home almost half the collegiate awards given statewide.

Junior Rebecca McKinsey, this year’s campus editor, took home first place in the “Best College Feature Writing” category for two articles she penned during her freshman year.  The first story, “Defying Differences,” was a touching piece about PersonnelPlus, a program that places workers with physical and mental disabilities into jobs in Athens and at Ohio University.  The second story, “OU alum spends lifetime photographing legends,” profiled famed jazz photographer and Ohio University alumnus Herman Leonard. McKinsey walks through the life of the then-87-year-old — from his decision to take up photography to his decision to enroll at OU.

In the “Best College Newswriting” category, former Campus Senior Writer Emily Grannis (a 2010 alumna) took second place for “Questionable relationships segue into detenuring process,” a revealing look into the interactions between former OU College of Business Dean C. Aaron Kelley and several of his female students. Kelley admitted to sexual relationships with his secretary as well as a former student. Then, OU discovered more than 6,500 pornographic images on his university-issued computer and uncovered text messages from a female student in which she referred to Kelley as “Mr. Banana.”

Last year’s Assistant Sports Editor Will Frasure brought home a second-place award for “Best College Sports Writing,” for various articles he authored last year. His work included a breakdown of what goes through the mind of OU football standout Levon Brazill as he returns a punt back for a touchdown. His front-page feature, “Call of Duty: Receiver Honors Brother Through On-field Apparel,” told the story of OU football player Riley Dunlop, who wore a U.S. Marine Corp. skull cap under his helmet at each game in honor of his brother, Branson, who was deployed in Afghanistan at the time.

I’m excited to hang these three plaques on our newsroom’s walls, and I know this staff will soon be earning a few more to keep them company.

Wesley Lowery is a senior studying journalism and editor-in-chief of The Post. Send him your congratulations at wl372808@ohiou.edu.

 

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