A band that has spent much of its time performing at The Front Room will cater to a new crowd this week in the back room of Donkey Coffee and Espresso, 17 1/2 W. Washington Street.

Gary “Buddy” Smith and Daniel Spencer — sophomores studying economics and English — formed their band, Fathers of the Revolution, in Harrisburg, Ohio after discovering they had a passion for music. In 2011, they added Luke

Chaffin, a sophomore who has yet to declare a major, to the mix. The band plays original songs they classify as “jazz,” “acoustic” or “weird folk music.”

“I find inspiration from my band mates,” Smith said. “I’ll sit around on an idea, but I can’t take it into any direction or make a full song out of it without other new sounds to play along with it. The happy accidents of others’ improvisation make me think of what could come next and then we have a new song.”

The group has performed at The Front Room, Smiling Skull Saloon and several other Athens venues, including Donkey open mics. On Friday, though, the band will make its featured debut at Donkey Coffee and Espresso.

“Playing at Donkey is always fun, always brings a good crowd,” Spencer said. “I like riling a good crowd up to get them to yell and scream, and it’s a full moon so hopefully that will have an effect.”

Smith said he is also excited for the event and for what it will mean for the group’s image.

“We’re known for being the two long-haired guys and the kid with the shaker, but at this performance, I am debuting my shorter hair,” Smith said. “I really think this will reflect that we’re a collection of individuals.”

Though the group was not forthcoming about their set-list, Smith said he is confident fans of their music will find something new to enjoy at the show.

“We always plan it out so that it tells a story,” he said. “When there’s a different place and different crowd, there’ll always be a different story. Friday’s show is going to have a new set with some new stuff.”

Also performing with the group will be Andrew McMillan, an Ohio University graduate who studied video production. McMillan describes his music as “eclectic, eccentric folk” music, a style that is cohesive with Fathers of the Revolutions’ style.

“I think we have a very similar energy; we have the same instruments and play similar music,” McMillan said. “It’s very fundamental songwriting and flows, which I’ve seen when we’ve jammed together before.”

ks574510@ohiou.edu