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In The News: Boston responds to tragedy with kindness

What happened last week at the Boston Marathon was a travesty. The two bombings left three people dead, almost 200 people in the hospital and countless others with trauma and uneasiness that they must now deal with.

When attacks like this happen, it’s easy to feel that the world is nothing but a dark and dismal place. However, in many instances when these things happen, it can bring out the best in people. Boston is no different.

Hours after the incident, USA Today collected a file of tweets and photos sharing the kindness being bestowed throughout Boston. Bostonians walked the streets offering food and a place to stay for marathon runners; they passed out drinks and offered a bathroom to use. Restaurants gave away free drinks and meals to anyone who wanted them. Many marathon runners who were not injured ran an extra two miles to the nearest hospital to donate blood.

Personal stories were also shared on Reddit, a crowdsourcing social network. One woman was a half-mile away from finishing when the explosions happened. She wandered the streets searching for her family until she crossed paths with a man who finished the race. They spoke a while, and when the man learned she was lost, searching for her family and had not finished, he gave her his finishing medal, telling her she had finished in his eyes.

Other accounts on Reddit give details of volunteers who had been near where the explosions went off. They accounted for how many people ran to help those who were hurt. They cut off circulation to those whose limbs had been blown off, they helped carry people to medics, they directed traffic to ease confusion and accidents while they gave their phones to those looking for loved ones.

The Telegraph accounts for all these good deeds as well. Google also set up a system in which people could locate loved ones or find/offer a place to stay.

The owner of a Mexican restaurant called El Pelon in Boston offered free drinks and a place to stay for those who didn’t want to be alone, according to The Telegraph.

“My coworkers and staff deserve a lot of credit: not one blinked when asked, not one went home when they could, those not working came in,” said the owner.

Museums were offering free entry the day after the bombings to help get people’s minds off the event, according to CBS News. There were several free yoga classes for people to attend throughout the city and several airlines offered free flights in and out of Boston.

People should not believe there is no kindness in this world, because Boston proved that there is. They proved that through the toughest of circumstances, the goodness of people can always be seen.

“Next year’s marathon will be even bigger and better,” said Gov. Deval Patrick, according to CNN.

Next year Boston will continue its marathon tradition and you can bet Bostonians will continue their tradition of being good, kind and heroic people.

Jessica Ensley is a sophomore studying journalism at Ohio University and a columnist for The Post. How did you react to the bombing? Email Jessica at je726810@ohiou.edu.

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