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Editorial: Ohio University Board of Trustees needs to schedule around students, faculty

It's difficult for OU students, professors and faculty to attend meetings in the middle of school days.

We were happy this week to see the Ohio University Board of Trustees return to meet in Athens for the second time this academic year.

It only makes sense for the board to meet often at its most populated campus, and that has happened far too sporadically in the past.

However, meeting on campus anywhere raises some concerns for us.

Students and faculty should be the lifeblood of Ohio University, or any school for that matter. It’s important for them to be actively engaged in the direction OU takes.

Right now, with the meat of the board’s meetings taking place during the middle of a school day, it’s tough for any OU student, professor or researcher to grab a seat over in Walter Hall.

Americans sometimes refer to the U.S. Capitol Building as the “people’s house.” The OU Board of Trustees ought to adopt a similarly inclusive mindset to encourage more public attendance.

Even just to report on the board’s dealings, which include moves such as raising tuition or razing old dorms, some Post reporters and editors have to skip classes. It’s not that we expect our stories to be easy to report. We just think it makes sense for the board to better accommodate students and faculty.

We’re glad the board live streams its meetings online, but we’d like to see that extended further.

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Perhaps the board could plan on starting meetings later in the morning so students could drop by once they finish class for the day. Or they could convene on a weekend.

We certainly don’t expect students to come out in droves to catch a meeting. But right now board members should do more to make their meetings more accessible. If that helps a few more professors or students find the time to see how their university is run, it’s a problem that was worth solving.

Editorials represent the majority opinion of The Post's executive editors: Editor-in-Chief Emma Ockerman, Managing Editor Rebekah Barnes and Digital Managing Editor Samuel Howard. Post editorials are independent of the publication's news coverage.

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