Day two of Number Fest included headliners Lil Dicky, Fetty Wap and The Chainsmokers.

Lil Dicky’s set was unlike any other performance at Number Fest.

His opening of “Professional Rapper” and an a cappella version of the “Star Spangled Banner” caused a stampede to the Main Stage, but the spectacle did not stop there. The rapper called up a female festgoer from the audience and gave her a pantless lapdance before ending his set with the songs “$ave Dat Money” and “White Crime.”

Day two of Number Fest continued the unprecedented streak of dry ground with far more attendees for headliners Niykee Heaton, Lil Dicky, Fetty Wap and The Chainsmokers than Friday.

The sun beat down on a sea of cargo shorts and jerseys when Cal Scruby came out for his 3 p.m. set. The Cincinnati rapper showed his love for Ohio in his “All For Ohio” T-shirt.

“This is how I know I’m home — O-H!” Scruby said, which was met with a crowd-roaring “I-O.”

Rapper Seysup returned for day two and filled the time between sets with his own material and public service announcements about free water.

Wes Welker & Dyl came onto the Main Stage for an unbilled performance of “Jordan Belfort” before quickly returning back to the Prime Stage, where they played the song again to a half-filled tent.

At dusk Fetty Wap came to the Main Stage and brought an extensive entourage of hype men with him. They made the ground shake when Fetty busted into the song “679.”

However, it was during “Trap Queen” that Fetty’s set hit its peak — the majority of the volume came not from the stage but the rowdy crowd.

Once headliners began performing, audiences were no longer entertained by Seysup's between sets.

The stage went dark and a single bass note came over the speakers as the crowd erupted when The Chainsmokers ascended from beneath the stage. The band's whole-hearted performance included hits such as “Roses” and “Don’t Let Me Down,” in addition to new material.

Jason Hemeyer, a recent graduate of Ohio State University, said the intensity The Chainsmokers brought made for a great performance.

“As a lover of EDM music, I am a big fan of The Chainsmokers,” Hemeyer said. “They are energetic and know how to amp up a crowd.”

With more well-known acts performing on Main Stage, talents at Prime Stage often could be overlooked.  

Aamir Nabeel, a senior studying psychology at Ohio State University, said acts such as Corrupt were strong performers and connected with fans.

“It doesn’t matter if you’re a fan or not,” Nabeel said. “He’ll make you feel like you’re involved even if you have no idea who he is.”

With all the hype that came from the rap and EDM artists, festgoers hardly had time to break during performances.

Jim Levesque, a freshman studying finance at Ohio University, said he liked the laid-back nature of Niykee Heaton’s performance.

“I thought she did really good,” Levesque said. “I liked the mellowness of her performance. It had a seductive (distinct) feel."

Despite the variety of music played at Number Fest, there was still dismay over the lack of transportation and alcohol policies.

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Kirstyn Archer, a junior studying journalism and English at OU, said the setup behind the regulations with alcohol is problematic.

“I’m upset about the alcohol and lack of transportation,” Archer said. “It’s illegal to walk on the street and drive drunk so we have limited options of what to do.”

Despite the new policies, some attendees still enjoyed the day filled with performances.

“Number Fest has always been great,” Jake Newton, a sophomore studying business at OU, said. “They made a lot of unfortunate changes this year but it’s still awesome.”

@jcooke1996

jc390413@ohio.edu

@broermazing

mb503414@ohio.edu

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