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The leading ladies of "Pitch Perfect:"

Aca-what? 'Pitch Perfect' to celebrate decade since release at Athena Grand

Celebration is in order for the film that many accredit for their knowledge of a capella. Ten years ago, "Pitch Perfect," inspired by Mickey Rapkin's book and directed by Jason Moore, was released, introducing the musical style to droves of viewers.

The Athena Grand, located on 1008 E. State St., is hosting a "Pitch Perfect" screening on Wednesday for its anniversary. The theater said it's the first time the film will return to the big screen. 

Typically, a group of singers perform a capella when they sing without using instruments. All the sounds necessary to perform a song, or multiple songs, come from the singers' mouths. "Pitch Perfect" inspired others to create their own a capella groups. The film's story continues to motivate people to cherish their friendships and try new things. 

When Beca Mitchell (Anna Kendrick) stubbornly arrives at Barden University for her freshman year, all she can think about is going to Los Angeles to produce music. But Beca’s father makes a deal with her: If she tries to enjoy herself at school but can't fathom the idea of returning for another year, he will pay for Beca to move to Los Angeles. Beca joins the Barden Bellas, an all-women a capella group, who only perform songs made popular by women. She successfully helps the Bellas change their music style to a more modern approach. By the end of the movie, the group sings songs such as "Price Tag" by Jessie J, "Just the Way You Are," by Bruno Mars and "Give Me Everything" by Pitbull. Beca develops a passion for a capella and the group. 

Similarly, some of the "Pitch Perfect" fan base found a new interest in a capella and the members of the Barden Bellas. A handful of people have even come to appreciate the difficulty of a capella. 

Devin Singh, a freshman studying business management and strategic leadership, said he believes that there is a level of skill to performing a capella because there are no instruments. 

"I think it's probably difficult for the singers at times because they don't have music to fall back on so they have to keep their pitches," Singh said. 

There is a culture of a capella that Yashvita Kanuganti, a freshman studying linguistics, said she assumes may be fun for the performers. 

"The culture seems really funny," Kanuganti said. "I'm not part of it, but it seems cute and interesting." 

Some people also can't believe the first "Pitch Perfect" movie of the trilogy came out 10 years ago. Emma Ayen, a senior studying music education, said the movie's anniversary makes her feel old. Ayen is the vice president of Bella Voce, a treble choir at Ohio University, and the president of Title IX, an a capella group on campus that was formed out of Bella Voce. 

Ayen said the groups don't compete, but they hold concerts and book gigs for events. Since Ayen is involved in a cappella, she said there's some truth about how "Pitch Perfect" portrays a cappella while parts of the film are dramatized for effect. 

"I definitely have to say if we do compete, we would basically be trying to learn the same songs… and just doing those songs over and over because it would work with our group," Ayen said. 

Despite some potential exaggeration of the film, Ayen said she still enjoys watching it and listening to the music. 

"I personally like it a lot," Ayen said. "My friend and I were driving back from IKEA a couple of weeks ago and we were just blasting 'Pitch Perfect' songs in the car." 

People may debate over whether "Pitch Perfect" made a cappella a more widely known music style, but Ayen said the film made a cappella a trend. The movie, despite being released 10 years ago, is remembered by many. 

"As soon as I went to high school people started making a cappella groups," Ayen said. "And then I just kept seeing them pop up here and there when I was looking at colleges. I was like, when did this all start? I definitely think 'Pitch Perfect' kind of set the trend, and then everybody wanted to be like them." 

@mcKennaChristy1

mc957019@ohio.edu

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