As the holiday season is in full swing and we quickly approach the end of another decade, 2020 is basically tomorrow. 

The 2010s will certainly live on in glory through the unforgettable music, hilarious memes, cringey scandals and, of course, the hottest and most heinous fashion trends. They always say to cut toxic people out of your life during New Year’s, but they never warn you about the toxic mainstream trends that will surely haunt you if not acknowledged and purged accordingly. 

Before welcoming in the new year, take a moment to reflect on all the trends and fads that have come and gone within the past ten years. Some trends rightfully dominated the era (flair jeans we’re looking at you), while others will always leave us feeling embarrassed for ever purchasing or wearing. Forgive but never forget, am I right?

For better or worse, it’s time to be grateful for the joggers and say your sweet goodbyes to the galaxy leggings. Here are a few of the best and worst trends of the past decade: 

Best: Athleisure

Nothing will define the current generation’s style more than an oversized hoodie, joggers and a pair of white sneakers. 2016 was the year that activewear became popular not only for working out, but for all day-to-day activities. Suddenly, everyday street style began to scream, “Duh, I’m going to the gym.” As people began sporting the comfort of sweatpants over the constraints of jeans, athleisure rightfully earned its place as an integral part of the 2010s hottest fashion fads. 

From the resurrection of the infamous Juicy Couture tracksuit to the wicked craze about all things Lululemon, the past decade has been overcome by fashion that promises comfort. Don’t set aside your biker shorts and yoga pants just yet, because this trend won’t be going anywhere any time soon.


Worst: Ripped jeans (sorry)

We’re tired of hearing the classic, “Did you get attacked by a tiger?” So let’s retire ripped jeans exactly where they belong: locked up forever in the 2010s. Better yet, just throw the key away too. 

Somehow, someway, jeans with holes in them are usually more expensive than regular jeans. In 2020, it’s time to do some serious soul searching. Is spending 20 extra dollars for holes in your jeans really worth getting mocked by Uncle Bob at Thanksgiving dinner every single year? No, not even a little bit. 

Ripped jeans may have had its special moment and you might have some emotional attachment from middle school, but all good things must come to an end. 

Trade up for some high-waisted vintage Levi’s to soothe any sorrow. 

Best: Vintage

Aside from athleisure, the 2010s served as a decade of recycled past trends that were readapted for popularity once again. From 2011 to 2014, mainstream fast fashion was at an absolute peak and oversaturated by clothing labeled Abercrombie & Fitch, Aeropostale or Hollister. However, it soon became obvious fast fashion was an expensive cycle and ultimately proved to be unsustainable for the planet.

As people began to look for alternative and sustainable ways to show style, vintage clothing such as platform shoes, tiny sunglasses, crop-tops, denim jackets and corduroy clothing all had their comeback moments throughout the decade as more people were thrifting into past fads. Throughout time some trends may have been dulled, but the 2010s allowed several to live once again in all their glory. 

Worst: Crossover fanny pack

We get it. You have an extensive Supreme collection and refer to yourself as hypebeast, but just wear the fanny pack around your waist. For decades, the fanny packs has been a functional favorite at concerts, theme parks, sporting events and more. But in 2018, they became a fashion statement.

The around-the-shoulder trend sparked as retailers and rappers like A$AP Rocky and Skepta drove the fad and brought it to the mainstream. However, the most popular crossover fanny packs came with a price more heinous than the trend itself such as the Louis Vuitton “Bum Bag Brooklyn” at $1180. Like many fads toward the end of the decade, this expensive clout trend certainly should remain in the past. 

Best: Scrunchies

Love it or hate it, the “VSCO girl” aesthetic is dominating not only social media platforms, but fashion at all angles. Let’s just say if anything good has come from the fad, it’s certainly the comeback of the scrunchie. After its golden age in the ’80s and ’90s, the staple hair accessory lost it’s zest as the 2000s traded in for thinner nylon hair ties.

However, before the decade could close, the scrunchie trend came back quicker than a VSCO girl saying “sksksk.” They can now be purchased by the bunch in a variety of pastel colors, patterns and sizes — ranging from $2 to $150. In the 2010s, the retro staple has found purpose in not only holding your hair back, but adding an extra colorful touch to any outfit… and to flex on VSCO. 

Worst: Wearing T-shirts of bands you didn't listen to

We’ve all done it at one point or another, and it makes for cringeworthy conversations. 2014 was a year that band tees became mainstream as retailers such as Forever 21 made them trendy for a cheap cost. Nothing beats the classic and versatile nature of a Nirvana, Pink Floyd or Led Zeppelin t-shirt… until you come into contact with a real rock fan and look like a poser.

Being a die-hard fan is one thing, but partaking in a mainstream trend for aesthetic purposes can make a band seem less like an artist and more like a brand. 

Best: Flair jeans

Although flair jeans disappear every few decades, there’s a reason why they always withstand the test of time. This past decade, the iconic ’70s fashion trend came knocking again, ready to hug your hips in all the right places. In 2017, the craze about skinny jeans and jeggings subdued after years of popularity, as looser fitting denim trends such as “flower child flairs” and “mom jeans” certainly had a retro revival. 

The timeless features are all in the flattering silhouette fit, versatility and elongating attributes.  If you haven’t already, leave the emotional attachment to your skinny jeans in 2019 and hold onto the bell-bottoms. You won’t be sad you kept them around.

Worst: Galaxy leggings

Simply put, these need to be thrown into a blackhole and forgotten about.

@maadilewellyn

ml203417@ohio.edu

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