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Editorial: Proposed budget includes $2 million to fight sexual assault

The two-year state budget proposed by Ohio Gov. John Kasich includes $2 million to fight sexual assault on college campuses in Ohio.Although details are slim about how the money would be spent — and the budget is still far from passing — it’s encouraging to see state funds allocated to combatting sexual assault on campus.Kasich’s two-year budget proposal mentions the funding set aside for fighting sexual assault — a topic that we and many OU students care deeply about and one that we have written about extensively in the past.“Ohio will identify best practices for preventing and responding to campus sexual assaults by Sept. 1, and allocate $2 million to implement these new strategies,” it reads.The Columbus Dispatch reported Wednesday that the Ohio Board of Regents — which oversees higher education in Ohio — is already working with “each public college and university to list areas in which they need help following Title IX, the federal law forbidding sexual assault and harassment.”The Dispatch also reported that the proposed $2 million would, in part, go toward hiring Title IX coordinators and student conduct officers for universities that need them. (Ohio University already employs a Title IX coordinator within its Office for Institutional Equity.)How this potential funding could specifically help OU remains to be seen, but the fact that Kasich proposed it in the first place is a good thing.And although the proposed $2 million doesn’t solve problems specific to OU or other public institutions around the state, it would be a step in the right direction when it comes to fighting sexual assault.Editorials represent the majority opinion of The Post's executive editors: editor-in-chief Jim Ryan, managing editor Sara Jerde, opinion editor Xander Zellner and projects editor Allan Smith. Post editorials are independent of the publication's news coverage.




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Editorial: Protests highlight need for meaningful discussion on tuition increases

Protests stifled the on-campus Board of Trustees meeting last week as the governing body of Ohio University voted to approve a 2 percent tuition hike for continuing students and a 5.1 percent increase for incoming freshmen.Certainly no one enjoys having to spend more for the same product — students included — and protesters let decision makers know just how displeased they are upon entering the meeting Friday. The Board’s response, which was to walk out of the meeting until “order” was restored, was a poor move to say the least. (Three students were arrested during that time.)Trustees shouldn’t forget that those protesters are the very students they serve.Administrators, students and trustees must show an increased willingness to engage in a meaningful discussion on tuition, and the trustees’ choice to remove themselves from a situation that makes them uncomfortable is counterproductive.Although the university continues to take steps to better connect with students, there’s always room for improvement. Administrators, students and trustees alike would be better served if tuition decisions were better explained to the student body.One way to accomplish this would be to email students easy-to-read reports (or Buzzfeed-esque “listicles,” perhaps?) detailing how the additional funds would be used.A more healthy dialogue could limit the amount of backlash against Board members and administrators, and could be helpful for students who are trying to understand how their money is being spent. In the end, it’s a win-win for all parties involved.Editorials represent the majority opinion of The Post's executive editors: editor-in-chief Jim Ryan, managing editor Sara Jerde, opinion editor Xander Zellner and projects editor Allan Smith. Post editorials are independent of the publication's news coverage.


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Editorial: Why Kroger but not Chipotle?

Athens City Council appears to have no qualms about Kroger applying for D5 and D6 liquor licenses for its East State Street location, according to a Post article published Thursday. Kroger wants to be able to sell beer, wine and low-proof liquor for consumption within the store. These licenses would allow the grocery store to serve alcohol — in addition to selling it for carryout, as they do now — and they would open the door to the possibility of an in-store bar.


OU Police Eddy

Editorial: Social media positive tool for OUPD

The Twitter account run by the Ohio University’s Police Department, @oupolice, has been active on social media all year. The latest instance was this past Friday, after a crime alert was posted in reference to an on-campus sexual imposition that allegedly took place last week.


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